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Minecraft Clan

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As We Grapple With The Complex Causality Of Disinformation And Fake News Proliferating Through The M !FULL!



Outstanding international affairs professionals inform and influence through clear and concise communications. Successful writers create a foundation for decision and action by efficiently providing context and logically presenting evidence. Effective policy writing anticipates a leader's needs and identifies challenges, present options, and uncover opportunities. This course uses short written assignments, exercises, and tailored feedback to hone the skills of accuracy, brevity, and clarity. We will write against the backdrop of current international affairs or national security challenges. Specific skills include the ability to start with your bottom line, explain complex information, develop recommendations, and write with proper syntax and grammar.




As We Grapple With The Complex Causality Of Disinformation And Fake News Proliferating Through The M


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This skills course will give students a foundation in giving formal briefings in a safe and supportive workshop environment. Students will be encouraged to try different approaches in developing a personal briefing style and to develop foundational skills in public speaking through mini exercises and in-class performance of a draft and final briefing. Students will also be introduced to the various types of briefings, to include considerations in the virtual environment, how to structure and organize each, how to communicate effectively with different audiences and venues, how to work with colleagues in developing and presenting materials especially on complex policy matters requiring a balancing of many different factors leading up to the actual presentation and delivery, and the elements of proper delivery through a learn-by-doing approach to developing a personal briefing style that will continue to evolve over the course of their careers.


This course explores the dynamics of team building, communication, and leadership that will increase managerial and leadership effectiveness. It is designed to empower participants to discover their preferred leadership style within a green and global context, emphasizing networking and servant leadership. Creating and sustaining a team involves a portfolio of skills which are particularly critical in a post-pandemic, horizontal and project-based environment, but also in traditional organizational hierarchies. In a volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous (VUCA) world, leaders must learn the tools of emotional intelligence and mindfulness, and develop a centered lens through which they can focus their contribution in global public service. Students will learn how to apply effective decision-making and problem-solving skills in teams; manage and resolve conflicts with appropriate communication skills; and identify and evaluate their own assumptions and behaviors related to leadership and group dynamics in organizations.


This seminar is designed as a graduate survey course to examine the national interests, institutions, actors, and processes involved in the making of U.S. national security. In particular, this course examines the challenges and issues confronting U.S. policymakers in the national security domain using a combination of lectures, videos, practical assignments, and a crisis simulation. The course content includes conceptual definitions of national security, policymaking processes and debates, national security institutions and organizations, relationships between foreign, economic and defense policy issues, as well as civil-military relations. While the course presumes familiarity with American politics and U.S. history, in-depth discussion into these topics will occur and students are encouraged to keep up on relevant world events by reading legitimate news sources to facilitate discussion and their assessment of US national security policy. By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically engage, understand, articulate and explain ideas and arguments about the U.S. national security process and the complexity of American strategic interests and decision-making processes.


The course would consider the interaction of the structures of a modern state with the Islamic legal heritage: How does a complex state with an array of bureaucratic and legal structures to cover education, resource allocation, criminal law, family life, etc--but also a state that proclaims Islam the official religion and the principles of the Islamic sharia as the main source of legislation--handle religion? The course would examine the questions raised comparatively and then focus specifically on the Egyptian experience. Parts would be conducted in conjunction with a similar class at AUC through teleconferencing and zoom. Joint parts would involve small group interaction, including a week-long simulation at the end in which students from the two institutions form teams to draft suggested reforms to Egypt's family law, the area where the most contentious debates about religion and state focus.


This course examines the problems and issues confronting American national security policymakers using a combination of empirical information and conceptual analysis. The course content includes conceptual definitions of national security, policymaking processes and debates, national security institutions and organizations, relationships between foreign, economic and defense policy, and civil-military relations. The course presumes familiarity with American politics and U.S. history and encourages students to keep up on relevant world events by reading legitimate news sources. At the end of the semester, students should be able to critically engage, understand, articulate and explain ideas and arguments about the U.S. national security process and the complexity of American strategic interests and decision-making processes.


Internet attacks are increasingly sophisticated and complex, and they can have huge impact on our everyday lives by disconnecting entire networks, disrupting food and gas supply chains, and leaking sensitive financial and personal information. As a result, the need for experts in all aspects in the Cybersecurity field is continuously increasing. In this class, we will first build our background knowledge on how computers communicate with one another, and how they work as parts of the Internet. Then we will learn about the indications that a device (computers, servers, handheld devices, and IoT / household devices connected to the Internet) is compromised or has atypical behavior. We use machine learning approaches to detect compromised machines through network traffic, denial of service attacks, and hijacking attacks. The course also features a non-coding track for students who are interested in the public policy and regulatory aspects of Cybersecurity. Skills we will focus on include Data science, Machine Learning, Network Traffic analysis, Internet Policies.


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